Trumpeting Trader Joe’s

“As hunger is cured by food, so ignorance is cured by study.” – Unknown Author

Ok, that is it!!! I’ve decided that Texas (Dallas) needs a Trader Joe’s in a BIG way!!! Now, it’s merely a matter of figuring out and plotting how I can get it to come here – as tight-lipped and business strict as TJ’s is.

I came across this lengthy feature story on Trader Joe’s on my yahoo page this afternoon and not only admired the structure and upbeat, quirky, colorful writing style of the author, but I immediately recalled to mind, with great fondness, the evenings I dropped into TJ’s with Michal off of the Foggy Bottom/GWU metro stop during my stay in D.C.

Here’s an excerpt that I thought you business-minded/economical people would appreciate as well as those with a love for TJ’s and the colorful details that make up something extraordinary:

A closer look at its selection of items underscores the brilliance of Coulombe’s limited-selection, high-turnover model. Take peanut butter. Trader Joe’s sells 10 varieties. That might sound like a lot, but most supermarkets sell about 40 SKUs. For simplicity’s sake, say both a typical supermarket and a Trader Joe’s sell 40 jars a week. Trader Joe’s would sell an average of four of each type, while the supermarket might sell only one. With the greater turnover on a smaller number of items, Trader Joe’s can buy large quantities and secure deep discounts. And it makes the whole business — from stocking shelves to checking out customers — much simpler.

Swapping selection for value turns out not to be much of a tradeoff. Customers may think they want variety, but in reality too many options can lead to shopping paralysis. “People are worried they’ll regret the choice they made,” says Barry Schwartz, a Swarthmore professor and author of The Paradox of Choice. “People don’t want to feel they made a mistake.” Studies have found that buyers enjoy purchases more if they know the pool of options isn’t quite so large. Trader Joe’s organic creamy unsalted peanut butter will be more satisfying if there are only nine other peanut butters a shopper might have purchased instead of 39. Having a wide selection may help get customers in the store, but it won’t increase the chances they’ll buy. (It also explains why so often people are on their cellphones at the supermarket asking their significant other which detergent to get.) “It takes them out of the purchasing process and puts them into a decision-making process,” explains Stew Leonard Jr., CEO of grocer Stew Leonard’s, which also subscribes to the “less is more” mantra.

Customers accept that Trader Joe’s has only two kinds of pudding or one kind of polenta because they trust that those few items will be very good. “If they’re going to get behind only one jar of Greek olives, then they’re sure as heck going to make sure it’s the most fabulous jar of Greek olives they can find for the price,” explains one former employee. To ferret out those wow items, Trader Joe’s has four top buyers, called product developers, do some serious globetrotting. A former senior executive told me that Trader Joe’s biggest R&D expense is travel for those product-finding missions. Trade shows that feature the flavor of the moment “are for rookies,” a former buyer said. Trader Joe’s doesn’t pick up on trends — it sets them.

Here’s the link: http://finance.yahoo.com/family-home/article/110437/inside-the-secret-world-of-trader-joes

Peace out,

Rachel Duke

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